Ideal Learning Assessment

This paper is a continuation of the initial paper on learning assessment based on Permendikbud No. 22 of 2016. The initial writing discusses the what and why material. This follow-up paper discusses how to design the ideal learning assessment .

Important Elements in the Ideal Learning Assessment

For ideal assessment, Charlotte Danielson in her book Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching shows four important elements in assessment, including: assessment criteria, monitoring student learning, feedback to students, and student self-assessment and monitoring progress.

Assessment criteria. An assessment is said to be weak if students do not know the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be assessed. An assessment is said to be sufficient if students know some of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be assessed.

An assessment is said to be good if students are fully aware of the criteria and performance standards by which their work will be assessed. And, the assessment is said to be ideal if students are fully aware of the criteria and performance standards in which their work will be assessed and contribute to the development of the criteria.

Monitoring student learning. An assessment is said to be weak if the teacher does not monitor student learning. An assessment is said to be sufficient if the teacher monitors the overall class progress but does not get diagnostic information.

An assessment is said to be good if the teacher monitors the progress of student groups in the curriculum, using limited diagnostic instructions to obtain information.

An assessment is said to be ideal if the teacher actively and systematically obtains diagnostic information from individual students regarding their understanding of individual student progress.

Feedback to students. An assessment is said to be weak if the quality of teacher feedback to students is low and not given at the right time. An assessment is said to be sufficient if the teacher’s feedback to students is uneven, and the timeliness is inconsistent.

An assessment is said to be good if teacher feedback to students is timely and consistently of high quality. An assessment is said to be ideal when teacher feedback to students is timely and consistently of high quality, and students take advantage of the feedback in their learning.

Student self-assessment and progress monitoring. An assessment is said to be weak if students are not involved in self-assessment and monitoring progress.

An assessment is sufficient when students sometimes rate their own work against the assessment criteria and performance measures. An assessment is said to be good if students frequently assess and monitor the quality of their own work against the assessment criteria and performance measures.

An assessment is said to be ideal if students not only frequently assess and monitor the quality of their own work against assessment criteria and performance measures but also actively use this information in their learning.

How to Design the Ideal Learning Assessment?

Based on the description above, it can be concluded that the ideal learning assessment includes at least the following elements:

  • There are assessment criteria and performance standards, all students know the assessment criteria and performance standards by which their work will be assessed; it is preferable that students are involved in developing performance criteria and standards regarding the assessment of their work;
  • Assessment criteria and performance standards are prepared by considering the results of monitoring student learning carried out by teachers actively and systematically;
  • Teachers provide timely and consistently high quality feedback to students (based on assessment results), students make use of the feedback in their learning;
  • Students often carry out self-assessments and monitor the quality of work themselves according to assessment criteria and performance standards, as well as use the information obtained in their learning.

 

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