Chinese gastronomy

Chinese gastronomy. Behind several typical dishes of Chinese gastronomy there are stories that involve traditional characters and values.

Summary

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  • 1 Cultural aspects
  • 2 Components
  • 3 toothpicks
  • 4 Uses
  • 5 seasonings
  • 6 Meals
  • 7 Local variants
  • 8 Source
  • 9 Sources

Cultural aspects

Chinese cuisine is closely related not only to society, but also to Chinese medicine and philosophy. He distinguishes between cai (cooked vegetables and by extension everything that comes with cereals) and cereals themselves, the fan. Yin (female) foods are tender, water-rich foods like fruits and vegetables, and have a refreshing effect. Yang (male) foods include fried, spicy and meat-based dishes, and are used for reheating. If all foods are to harmonize flavors, Chinese foods also need to strike a balance between hot and cold, colors, and the consistency of various foods. Therefore, Chinese culinary techniques are numerous and particularly varied. The succession of dishes as known in western countries is replaced by the search for balance between the five basic flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter and spicy). For this reason, dishes with an exclusively sweet flavor are only offered at the end of feasts given for large celebrations. The view also plays an important role in the presentation of the dishes. Some dishes are served for essentially therapeutic purposes, such as swallow nests or shark fins which are tasteless ingredients. The concept of the complementarity between hot and cold, inherited from Chinese medicine, is particularly taken into account in the gastronomy of the south of this country. dishes with an exclusively sweet flavor are only offered at the end of feasts given for large celebrations. The view also plays an important role in the presentation of the dishes. Some dishes are served for essentially therapeutic purposes, such as swallow nests or shark fins which are tasteless ingredients. The concept of the complementarity between hot and cold, inherited from Chinese medicine, is particularly taken into account in the gastronomy of the south of this country. dishes with an exclusively sweet flavor are only offered at the end of feasts given for large celebrations. The view also plays an important role in the presentation of the dishes. Some dishes are served for essentially therapeutic purposes, such as swallow nests or shark fins which are tasteless ingredients. The concept of the complementarity between hot and cold, inherited from Chinese medicine, is particularly taken into account in the gastronomy of the south of this country.

Components

As is known, the basic component is rice, this component is critical and unifying many dishes in Chinese cuisine. Unifying because there are innumerable regional variants in many parts of China, but this ingredient is present in all of them, especially in southern China. By contrast, wheat-based products that include pasta and steamed buns are predominant in northern China where rice is not as dominant in dishes. Despite the importance of rice in Chinese cuisine, in extremely formal cases, if rice has not been served and there are no longer any dishes on the table, in this case, rice is served to diners. The soup that is generally served at the end of the meal to satiate the diner’s appetite in this way. The custom of serving soup at the beginning of meals comes from the culinary customs of the West in these modern times. The vegetarian movement in China is almost nil and, if it exists, it is usually of Buddhist origin. Many of the vegetables in Chinese cuisine are not served raw because human stools were traditionally used as fertilizer for cultivation. The frequent periods of famine that have traditionally plagued the country have led the Chinese to develop recipes that allow all the edible parts of animals to be accommodated, such as guts, cartilage, heads, bird claws, etc. Tea is the most consumed drink in China. Traditionally, beer and rice alcohol are reserved for celebrations and parties. At everyday meals, Drinks are not served and diners quench their thirst with soups and broths. Traditional Chinese cuisine does not use milk, due to the lactose intolerance that is very prevalent in many Asian countries. Desserts are less typical in Chinese cuisine than in western gastronomies since it is not customary for meals to end with a dessert. Sweet foods are often introduced during the course of the meal without distinction. For example, fruits are used as an accompaniment to some dishes. Therefore desserts do not exist in Chinese cuisine. What we can mention as dessert are sweet dishes, many of them fried and incorporate red bean paste (dousha). Matuan and doushabao are stuffed with dousha and are often eaten for breakfast, dousha is often eaten with steamed buns, some of them are pear shaped, an important cultural symbol in china. Another sweet dish is the Babao Fan or “Eight Treasures Rice Pudding”.

Chopsticks

Food is prepared in small portions (for example, vegetables, meat, doufu), so that they can be eaten directly pinched with chopsticks. Traditionally, Chinese culture has considered the use of a knife and fork at the table as a “barbaric” act because these cutlery are used in warfare as weapons.

The fish is cooked and served whole, diners pinch the pieces of fish and eat pieces of it. This way of serving the fish guarantees the diner that he is eating the freshest fish possible. A Chinese saying reads: “including head and tail” referring to the complete fulfillment of a certain task, in this case, the saying is similar for the way of serving fish.

Applications

In a Chinese meal, each diner has their own bowl of rice and the dishes are served communally at a table in a bowl or tray, this shape is known in some western kitchens as “family style”. In the meal, each diner takes part of the communal dishes, pinching the chopsticks piece by piece; This is in stark contrast to Western culinary uses where it is served individually on plates at the start of meals. Many of the inhabitants of China feel uncomfortable allowing a person to insert their own chopsticks (which may have traces of saliva) in communal dishes, for this hygienic reason separate dishes are often served so that these foods can be separated.

Seasonings

Cinco Sabores Powder: It is a curry prepared with star anise, fennel seeds, cloves, cinnamon and szechuan pepper. It is known as “Um Gion Fan” (five flavors). It is used for marinating or cooking.

“Dragon’s Teeth”

Tamarind sauce

Tausi beans or Salty Black Beans.

Algae

Chives

Dried shrimp

Raw octopus

Ginger

Rice noodles

Sesame or sesame oil is one of the most characteristic flavors of Chinese cuisine. It is obtained by cold pressing the toasted sesame or sesame seeds.

Rice wine Made from glutinos or millet, fermented glutinous, and aged for ten years or more. Rice wine is a sweet liquid with a low alcohol content. It is consumed both for drinking and for cooking.

Oyster sauce

Fish sauce

Bamboo

Soy sauce

 

Foods

Noodles with Prawns.

Chop suey

Nasi Goreng

Lumpia

Peking lakeado duck

Lo mein

Chow mein

Wantan soup

Wanton mee

Mochi

Hainan chicken and rice

fried rice

Local variants

The number of regional variants in Chinese cuisine is immense, as befits a country of this size.

 

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