What Is The Olympic Flame?

The Olympic flame is lit at the start of the Olympic Games ceremony as a symbol of the Olympic movement and continues to burn until the end of the event. An architect, Jan Wis who decorated the Amsterdam stadium for the 1928 Summer Olympic Games, gave the idea of ​​lighting a flame. The idea of ​​lighting the flame came from a similar practice of the ancient Greeks who kept the sacred burning fire for the entire celebration of the Olympics. The Olympic flame has become a tradition in all the summer Olympics since its introduction in 1928. It is a tradition that well-known athletes or athletes with remarkable results are the last runners of the Olympic torch relay.

The travel routes of the Olympic torch symbolize the success of the athletes. The torch is usually transported by runners but has been transported in other ways, such as by plane or boat. In 1976 an exceptional method was used to transport the Olympic torch. The flame was converted into a radio signal and then transported from Europe to the New World. The heat detectors in Athens, Greece, sensed the flame and then sent the signal to Ottawa via the satellite.

In the year 2004, the divers carried the Olympic torch underwater for part of the distance. they sensed the flame and then sent the signal to Ottawa through the satellite. In the year 2004, the divers carried the Olympic torch underwater for part of the distance. they sensed the flame and then sent the signal to Ottawa through the satellite. In the year 2004, the divers carried the Olympic torch underwater for part of the distance.

Protests against the Olympic torch relays

In some parts of the world there have been protests against the Olympic torch relays. In 1956, during the Melbourne Games in Australia, a veterinary student successfully delivered a fake flame to Pat Hills, the mayor of Sydney, and fled. Attempts to extinguish the flame were also made during the 2008 Olympic Games as a protest against the human rights record in China. A steel ring was created to protect the flame, but a demonstrator managed to get hold of the torch while it was in the hands of the TV presenter in London.

There was also a protest against the Olympic torch in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, during the 2016 Olympics to highlight the economic crisis in Brazil. The protesters managed to extinguish the Olympic flame by claiming that the country had spent a large sum of money to host the Summer Olympic Games. Extreme weather conditions can also repel Olympic flames. For example, during the 1976 Summer Olympics hosted in Montreal, Canada, a storm sparked the Olympic flame a few days after the games began. The flame was rekindled using the original reserve sources of the Olympic flame.

The incidents mentioned above, and other similar events, make it clear that the Olympic torch relay process is not completely secure. An Olympic flame could be emitted deliberately or accidentally during the retransmission process. This concern has led to an outburst of ideas regarding the design of the Olympic torch to minimize the chances of the flame dying.

So what happens when the flame goes out?

Usually a spare torch is turned on or turned on.

The current Olympic flames have been designed in a unique and impressive way to curb the unpredictable extinction of the Olympic flame. The Olympic cauldrons are designed and used to protect the Olympic flame. One of the most infamous forms of protest took place during the 1956 Melbourne Games in Australia. A city veterinary student deceived the spectators by bringing a fake flame and successfully transmitted it to the mayor of Sydney at that time.

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