Scylla; A Sea Monster In Greek Myths

Scylla (Σκύλλα) or Skilla, in the Greek creation of myths, is a terrible sea monster that lived in a cave on a steep cliff of a narrow strait and together with Charybdis destroyed passing sailors and their ships. The Scylla rock rose high with a sharp tip to the sky and was forever covered with dark clouds and twilight; access to it was not possible due to the smooth surface and steepness. In the middle, at a height above even an arrow, a cave developed, facing a dark opening to the west: in this cave lived the terrible Scyla.

Glaucus and Scylla, 1582, Bartolomeus Spranger
Without constant barking (Σκύλλα, in translation it means barking), the monster is crashing into the surroundings with a piercing scream. Scylla had twelve paws in front, six long, flexible necks rising on dull shoulders, and heads on each neck; her mouth gleamed with frequent, sharp, three-rowed teeth. Moving back into the cave and exposing her breasts outward, she followed the prey with all her heads, whispering her paw around the cliff and catching dolphins, seals and other sea animals.

As the ship passed through the cave, Scylla, with all her mouth open, suddenly stole six men from the ship (Homer, Odyssey, XII 85-100, 245-250). In such properties Scylla describes Homer. As for Scylla’s genealogy, Homer calls his mother the nymph Kratheid, the daughter of Hecate and Triton. In other mythographic sources Scylla is considered the daughter of Forkis and Hecate or Triton and Lamia, or Typhoon and Echidna, or Poseidon and Krateida. In post-heroic stories, Scylla sometimes seems like a pretty girl. Ovid says that Scylla was a beautiful nymph at first. She spent all her days at sea with her friends, each time rejecting the love that was offered to her.
Once the sea god Glaucus fell in love with her, and the sorceress Circe, enchanted by Glaucus himself, out of jealousy Scylla mutilated her beautiful body by turning the lower part into a series of dog heads (Ovid, Metamorphoses, XIII 730-737; 900-968).

Scylla and Charybdis, Roger Payne
In another legend, this transformation of the beauty into a monster was entirely Amphitrite, who, noticing that Poseidon was seduced by the beauty of Scylla, decided in this way to get rid of the dangerous rival. For the abduction of the Gerion bulls from Hercules, Scylla was last killed, but Forkis revived him. Virgil mentions several Scylls who, among other monsters, inhabit the suburbs of Tartarus. In the artwork Scylla is depicted in the form of a monster with a dog’s head and two dolphin tails, or with two horror heads and a dolphin tail.

The geographical position of Scylla and Charybdis was limited by the ancients to the Strait of Messina, with Charybdis located in the Sicilian part of the strait below Cape Pelorsky, and Scylla on the opposite cape in Brutiau, near the Region, which bore its name in Greek (Σκύλλλι). At the same time, there is a noticeable inconsistency between Homer’s fantastic description of the incredible dangerous strait and the actual character of the Messen Strait, which seems far less dangerous to sailors.

Skilla (Scylla), Greek – a sea monster with six dog heads (with three rows of teeth in the mouth) and twelve legs, as well as one royal daughter.The parents of the monstrous EXERCISE were usually considered the sea god Forkis and the goddess of the raging waves of Crateid or the hundred-headed giant Typhon and his wife Echidna. It is not clear if SKILLA was so ugly at birth – with the ugliness of her parents, it would be quite natural. However, some authors say that SKILLA used to be a beauty, and she was turned into a monster by Poseidon’s wife, who envied her beauty, or a sorceress (due to the fact that SKILLA bathed in her bath with infusions of magical herbs).

SKILLA lived in a deep cave on the coastal rock of the strait, in which the terrible Charybdis waited for the sailors. SKILLA also tried not to miss a single ship, grabbed a sailor with each of the six heads and devoured her victims right there; she did not despise dolphins, seals, and other marine life. returning from Colchis with a golden fleece, they managed to pass SKILLA without loss, just as Aeneas later did; Odysseus sailed past SKILLS twice, but stole six satellites from his ship on the first pass. When she passed SKILLA with Gerion’s herd, she stole an ox from him. For that, Hercules killed SKILL, but the sea god Forkis was resurrected, and she started working on the old one again. In ancient times, her place of residence was considered a dangerous rock in the Strait of Messina between Sicily and Calabria. In Calabria,

The other SKILLA was the daughter of Nis, the king of Sicilian Megara (see the article “Nis”).
However, this was precisely the first FAITH imprinted in our mind, which his neighbor Charybdis constantly follows. Being between Scylla and Charybdis means being between two equal dangers. (A variant of this expression: “Whoever wants to avoid Charybdis falls for Scylla.”)

Skilla (Dr. Greek Σκύλλα, in Latin transliteration Scylla, lat. Scylla) and Charybdis (Dr. Greek Χάρυβδις, transcription of Charybidis allowed) – sea monsters from ancient Greek mythology.
In Greek mythology, Scylla and Charybdis are two monsters of the Sicilian Sea, living on either side of a narrow strait and destroying sailors who sail between them. These are ruthless incarnations of the sea.
Once beautiful nymphs were turned into monsters with six heads, with three rows of teeth in each head, with ugly long necks.

Those screaming, roaring monsters swallowed the sea and spat it back (the personification of a terrible whirlwind, open sea depths). Being between Scylla and Charybdis means being in danger from different angles at the same time.Long ago in Greece lived a beautiful nymph – the sea goddess Scylla. The girl was so beautiful that she was watched not only by sailors who swam the sea, but also by the sea gods. The gods themselves lived on the island for centuries where they bathed in a beautiful forest lake.

The god of fishermen Glaucus looked at her. This was the end of the beauty’s normal life. The fact is that Glaucus also loved the witch Circe who was amused by the fact that she turned people into animals. She poisoned a lake on the island of Scylla. and when the little girl dived into the waters of the lake, she appeared like a terrible monster, a multi-headed dragon-dog. Seeing her reflection in the sea, she went mad – she climbed a rock and began to devour the sailors who passed by the ships. By the way, those who didn’t finish Scylla devoured Charybdis. Charybdis is such a sea demon, more precisely a demon. No one saw her, but everyone saw the vortex, which creates a charybd when the ships pass their mouths, along with people from whom Scylla is not fed.

Charybdis – a terrible sea monster from Greek mythology, was considered the daughter of Poseidon and Gaia.
Many believe that Charybdis is a huge vortex than an animal. But if it is an animal, then it is obviously invertebrate.
Interesting facts:
In Konchalov’s Odyssey, Scylla is like a dragon with multiple heads, and Charybdis is like a giant jaw that swallows ships.
“Scylla” in Greek means “barking”
There is a shrimp of the same name in the Adriatic Sea.
Also, in some fantastic works by local authors there are multi-headed space animals of the same name.
Virgil mentions several Skills that inhabit the penultimate end of Tartarus among other monsters.
In the story of the Strugatska brothers, the distant rainbow “Charybdis” is the name of the mechanism (device on the tracks) that absorbed the energy of the waves – cataclysms caused by the experiment of physicists.
There is also the Skillian Rock network in the Adriatic Sea (according to legend, Scylla lived on it).
Straight with Jellyfish Gorgon Scylla is one of the monsters from the game “Castellania”
The origin of Scylla and Charybdis
According to the description in Homer’s Odyssey, the rock of Scylla rose to the very sky and was always covered with dark clouds and twilight; due to the smooth surface and steepness it was impossible to climb. In the middle of the rock, at a height beyond the reach of the arrow, was an overgrown cave, facing west: the terrible Scylla (Skilla) lived in that cave. Boating incessantly, the monster announced the surroundings by penetrating the surroundings. Twelve slender legs moved in front of Scylla, six long flexible necks rose on his shoulders, and a head stuck on each neck; her mouth gleamed with frequent, sharp, three-rowed teeth. Throwing all six heads out of the cave and spinning them, Scylla followed the prey and caught dolphins, seals and other sea animals. As the boat passed the cave, Scylla, with all her mouth open, suddenly stole six people from the boat.
“… this smooth cliff, as if someone had cut it.
They roam the smooth rock and catch fish under it. ”
“Know this: not mortal evil, but immortal Scylla. Cruel
Terribly strong and wild. The battle with her is impossible.
You will not take power here. Just an escape is a flight. ”
Stay away! The farmer himself would not save you here! ”
In general, in the ancient Greek epic Charybdis was the epitome of a representation of the all-pervading deep sea. Sometimes below it is depicted a sea deity or a monster living in Charybdis. The origin of Scylla and Charybdis

In ancient Greek mythology, Scylla (Skilla) and Charybdis were sea monsters. According to Homer’s Odyssey (c. 8th century BC), Scylla and Charybdis lived on opposite sides of the strait on a rock (Scylla) and below a rock (Charybdis) at a distance from the arrow. The position of Charybdis and Skilla was most commonly connected with the Strait of Mesen 3 to 5 km wide between Italy and Sicily.
Various ancient Greek authors considered Scylla the daughters of Forkis and Hecate, Forbant and Hecate, Triton and Lamia, Typhon and Echidna, Poseidon and the nymph Kratayida, Poseidon and Gaia, Forkis and Kratayida. Homer called his mother Kratayida, the daughter of Hecate and Triton. Akusilai and Apollonius called Sratha Kratayida, daughter of Fork and Hecate. Charybdis was considered the daughter of Poseidon and Gaia.

According to the description in Homer’s Odyssey, the rock of Scylla rose to the very sky and was always covered with dark clouds and twilight; due to the smooth surface and steepness it was impossible to climb. In the middle of the cliff, at a height unattainable for an arrow, a cave was built facing the entrance to the west: in this cave lived the terrible Scyla (Skill

Boating incessantly, the monster announced the surroundings by penetrating the surroundings. Twelve slender legs moved in front of Scylla, six long flexible necks rose on his shoulders, and on each neck a head; her mouth gleamed with frequent, sharp, three-rowed teeth. Throwing all six heads out of the cave and spinning them, Scylla followed the prey and caught dolphins, seals and other sea animals. As the boat passed the cave, Scylla, with all her mouth open, suddenly stole six people from the boat.
“… this is smooth
on the cliff, as if someone had chased her away.
It is a gloomy large cave in the middle of a cliff.
She turned the entrance into the darkness, west, toward Erebus.
Pass by her boat beside her, nobleman Odysseus.
Even the strongest archer targeting the bow from the ship,
The hollow cave could not be reached with an arrow.
The terribly growing Scyla lives in a cave rock.
An evil monster. There is no one who sees her
I felt joy in my heart – even if God came across it
Scylla is twelve feet tall and they are all thin and thin.
Six long spindles are twisted on the shoulders and neck
On a terrifying head, in everyone’s mouth in three rows
Full of black death, abundant, frequent teeth.
In the living room, she sits half body,
Six heads stand out above the terrible abyss,
They roam the smooth rock and catch fish under it. ”

Gigin (64 BC – 17 BC) In the Myths he portrayed Scylla as a dog from below and a woman from above. In works of ancient Greek art, Scylla was often depicted as a monster with a dog’s head and two dolphins, or with two horror heads and a dolphin tail.Virgil mentioned several Scythians who inhabited the suburbs of Tartarus. According to Homer, Scylla was immortal and very strong.

“Know this: not mortal evil, but immortal Scylla. Cruel
Terribly strong and wild. The battle with her is impossible.
You will not take power here. Just an escape is a flight. ”
In some stories, Scylla seemed like a pretty girl — either Glaucus or Poseidon’s mistress. According to Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the sorceress Kirk poisoned the water out of jealousy when Scylla took a bath, and Scyla became an angry beast, and her lower part turned into a series of dog heads. According to the “Works of Dionysus” of Nikon (4th-5th century AD), this transformation of Scylla was carried out by Amphitrina.

Homer’s Charybdis has no individuality, although he attributes it to a sea deity: it is just a sea vortex that absorbs and drinks sea water three times a day as many times as: “no one has seen it. Charybdis hides underwater, opening its giant mouth wide, and the waters of the straits rumble with the inner bushes into a black hole. ”
“It grows wild on the rock of that fig with lush leaves.
Just below it from Charybdis are divine black waters
Terrible rage. He swallows them three times a day
And he smokes three times. See: when it absorbs –
Stay away! The farmer himself would not save you here! ”

In general, in the ancient Greek epic Charybdis was the epitome of a representation of the all-pervading deep sea. Sometimes below it is depicted a sea deity or a monster living in Charybdis.
Skill

1) a sea monster waiting for sailors in a cave, on a steep cliff of a narrow strait (on the other side of which lived another monster, Charybdis). The skill has six dog heads on six necks, teeth in three rows and twelve legs. She is the daughter of the sea deity Forkia or Kratheida (options: Hecate, Echidna, etc.). Odysseus managed to swim Skill and Charybdis (Hom. Od. XII 85-100, 245-250). According to Ovid, Skilla is mixanthropic: she has a female face and a torso surrounded by dogs (Ovid. Met. XIII 730-733). Once a beautiful virgin rejected all the udbas and the sea god Glaucus, who was in love with her (XIII 734-7J7; 900-968), who sought help from the sorceress Kirke. But in love with Glaucus Kirk out of revenge he turned Skill into a monster (XIV 1-69); 2) daughter of King Megara Nis, in love with King Minos, who surrounded their city. She pulled her purple hair from her father, which made him immortal, to betray the city of Minos, which promised to marry Skill. Minos captured Megara, but then drowned Scylla, fearing her (Apollod. III 15, 8). According to another version, Skilla was thrown into the sea after sailing the ship Minos, and when Nis turned into an eagle he began to chase his daughter, her body overgrown with feathers and she became a bird (Ovid Met. VIII 6-152).
Characters and cult objects of Greek mythology. 2012
See also interpretations, synonyms, meanings of words and what SCILLA is in Russian in dictionaries, encyclopedias and reference books:
• Skill
sees Scylla and …
• Skill in Modern Explanation, TSB:
see Scylla and …
• HARIBDA AND EXERCISE in the Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Brockhaus and Euphrates:
(Scylla), ????????, ?????? – X. in the ancient Greek epic – a personified depiction of the all-encompassing deep sea (etymologically X. – means “vortex”, although …
• HARIBDA AND EXERCISE in the Encyclopedia of Brockhaus and Efron:
(Scylla), ????????, ?????? ? X. in the ancient Greek epic? a personified depiction of the all-encompassing deep sea (etymologically X.? means “whirlpool”, although …
• CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY: SKILL AND HARIBDA in the Collier Dictionary:
To the article CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY In Greek mythology there are two huge dangers that await sailors in the Strait of Messina, which divides Italy and Sicily. Skilla …
• SCHOOL AND HARIBDA (SKILLA AND HARIBDA) in the Handbook of Phraseology:
In Greek mythology, two monsters lived on either side of a narrow strait and destroyed sailors passing between them. To be between Scylla …
• RAGNAROK ONLINE
Given the official start of the game in Russia, it is worth recalling the main console teams. Enter the following commands in the main chat line …
• HEROES OF POWER AND MAGIC 5 in the list of Easter eggs and game codes:
Go to \\ profile \\ and look for the autoexec.cfg file there. Make a backup (just in case) and then open it in …
• FORKIS
(Fork, Forky, Forkin) – sea deity, god of the stormy sea, son of Pontus and Gaia, brother and husband of Keto, brother of the sea giant …
• Scylla and Charybdis in the Dictionary of the Dictionary of Myths of Ancient Greece:
(Skilla and Charybdis) – two monsters that lived on both sides of the narrow strait and destroyed the sailors who passed between them. Scylla – …
• Hecate in the Dictionary of the Dictionary of Myths of Ancient Greece:
– protector of evil spirits, witch. The daughter of the Titanic Persians and Asters? She was identified with the goddess of the moon Selena, the goddess of the underworld Persephone, the goddess …
• NIS
1) King Megara, son of Pandion (Apollod. III 15, 5). He is credited with building Nisee – the port of Megara. Nisa grew on her head …
• XARIBDA in the Directory of Characters and Cult Objects of Greek Mythology:
In Greek mythology, a monster in the form of a terrible vortex, three times a day absorbing and lurking the black waters of a narrow strait, on the other hand …
• SCILLA
(Skilla) 1) Daughter of the Megar king Nis 2) A sea monster that lived on the shore of one of the straits, on the other side from which he lived …
• NIS in the Dictionary-Directory Who is who in the ancient world:
1) King Megara, whose life and joy reigned were closed with purple (version: golden) hair on his head. (Compare with …
• An Odyssey in the Literary Encyclopedia: a
Greek epic poem, along with the Iliad (see) attributed to Homer (see). Since he finished later than the Iliad, O. joins …
• FORKIS in the Dictionary of the Great Encyclopedia:
(Forky Forkin), in Greek mythology a sea deity, son of Pontus and Gaius, brother and husband of Keto, father of gray, gorgons, Hesperides, Ladon. …
• Scylla and Charybdis in the Dictionary of the Great Encyclopedia:
(Skilla and Charybdis) in Greek mythology, two monsters that lived on either side of a narrow strait and destroyed sailors passing between them. …
• Nothing in the Dictionary of the Great Encyclopedia:
(1st half of the 4th century BC) Ancient Greek artist from Thebes, father and teacher of Aristide the Younger. In the old days they were famous …
• Scylla and Charybdis in the Great Soviet Encyclopedia, TSB:
and Charybdis, Skill and Charybdis, in ancient Greek mythology, two monsters that lived on both sides of the narrow strait between Italy and …

Description of Homer
Rock Skills rose high with a sharp tip to the sky and was forever covered with dark clouds and twilight; access to it was not possible due to the smooth surface and steepness. In the middle, at a height above even an arrow, a cave developed, facing a dark vent to the west: the terrible Skilla lived in this cave. Slightly incessantly ( Σκύλλα – “barking”), the monster announced the neighborhood with a piercing scream. In front of Skill twelve paws moved, six long flexible necks rose on muddy shoulders, and a head was stretched out on the neck; her mouth gleamed with frequent, sharp, three-rowed teeth. Moving back into the cave and pulling out her breasts, she followed the prey with all her heads, her paws whispering around the cliff and catching dolphins, seals and other sea animals. As the ship passed through the cave, Skilla, covering all her jaws, suddenly stole six men from the ship. Homer’s skill is outlined in such features.

When Odysseus and his companions passed through the strait between Skilla and Charybdis, the latter eagerly soaked up the salt water. Given that death from Charybdis inevitably threatens everyone, while Skilla could only catch six people with his paw, Odysseus, by losing six of his comrades devoured by Skilla, avoids a terrible strait.
According to Gigin, there is a dog from below, a woman from above. She gave birth to 6 dogs, and she slapped 6 companions of Odysseus.
Like Odysseus, Charybdis and Jason passed happily with their companions, thanks to the help of Tethys; Aeneas, who was also in front of the road between Skilla and Charybdis, preferred to bypass the dangerous place by a roundabout.
Geography
Geographically, the place where Charybdis and Skillas were older natives was on the Strait of Messina, with Charibdah located in the Sicilian strait below Cape Pelorsky, and Skill on the opposite cape (in Brutiau, near the Region), which bears its name in historical time ( Latin) Scyllaeum promontorium , Greek Σκύλλαιον ) At the same time, there is a noticeable inconsistency between Homer’s fantastic description of the incredible dangerous strait and the actual character of the Messen Strait, which seems far less dangerous to sailors.
Interpretation
The rationalist interpretation of these monsters is given by Pompey Trog. According to Polybius’ interpretation, fishing is described on the Rock of Skille. According to another interpretation, Skilla is a fast-paced three Tyrrhenian from whom Odysseus escaped. According to the third interpretation, Skilla lived on an island, was a beautiful heterosexual and had parasites with which she “ate” (ie ruined) others.
In literature and art
This was followed by Stesichore’s song “Skilla” (fr. 220 pages), thanks to Timothy “Skilla”

Leave a Comment