What Is The Concept of Kidnapping

The words abduct and kidnap derive from borrowed Latin and Scandinavian words stems. The first recorded uses of kidnap in the English language appear in the seventeenth century, while abduct appears in the nineteenth century. Today, while legal definitions and terms of the words vary worldwide, common usage refers to taking someone away illegally through force or fraud, with intent to prevent liberation. Abductors usually kidnap with the purpose of carrying out one or more other crimes, such as rape, robbery, murder, or a combination thereof. Abduction and kidnapping existed long before the seventeenth century, especially with regard to rape during wartime. Historically, conquered peoples were considered war spoils and were enslaved. Women were abducted, raped, and deemed wives or concubines of their captors.

Ancient Hebrews captured and made foreign women concubines. Ancient Greeks nabbed and raped women during wartime and made them wives and concubines. Thirteenth-century warlord Genghis Khan returned from conquered tribes with the wives of chieftains. Khan defined a man’s highest function as ruining enemies through seizure of possessions and women. In fifteenth-century England, soldiers often gained control of a woman’s property through sexual seizure. During the American Revolution, British soldiers abducted women and carried out rapes in war encampments.

Anthropological accounts from the early to the middle twentieth century indicate gang rapes of women captured by Yanomamo¨ raiding parties in Venezuela and sexual abduction of women in Kenya by Gusii tribesmen who could not afford bride prices. In the late twentieth century, rape was used as a systematic wartime tool of intimidation and genocide in Rwanda, Africa, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serbian forces organized widespread imprisonment of Muslim and Croat women in detention centers and military brothels, where they endured multiple rapes. An estimated 50,000 women and girls were systematically raped.

The words abduct and kidnap derive from borrowed Latin and Scandinavian words stems. The first recorded uses of kidnap in the English language appear in the seventeenth century, while abduct appears in the nineteenth century. Today, while legal definitions and terms of the words vary worldwide, common usage refers to taking someone away illegally through force or fraud, with intent to prevent liberation. Abductors usually kidnap with the purpose of carrying out one or more other crimes, such as rape, robbery, murder, or a combination thereof. Abduction and kidnapping existed long before the seventeenth century, especially with regard to rape during wartime.

Historically, conquered peoples were considered war spoils and were enslaved. Women were abducted, raped, and deemed wives or concubines of their captors. Ancient Hebrews captured and made foreign women concubines. Ancient Greeks nabbed and raped women during wartime and made them wives and concubines. Thirteenth-century warlord Genghis Khan returned from conquered tribes with the wives of chieftains. Khan defined a man’s highest function as ruining enemies through seizure of possessions and women. In fifteenth-century England, soldiers often gained control of a woman’s property through sexual seizure.

During the American Revolution, British soldiers abducted women and carried out rapes in war encampments. Anthropological accounts from the early to the middle twentieth century indicate gang rapes of women captured by Yanomamo¨ raiding parties in Venezuela and sexual abduction of women in Kenya by Gusii tribesmen who could not afford bride prices. In the late twentieth century, rape was used as a systematic wartime tool of intimidation and genocide in Rwanda, Africa, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serbian forces organized widespread imprisonment of Muslim and Croat women in detention centers and military brothels, where they endured multiple rapes. An estimated 50,000 women and girls were systematically raped.

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