History of Pathology;10 Facts You Must Know

Pathology as the scientifc study of disease processes has its
deep roots in medical history. Since the beginning of mankind,
there has been desire as well as need to know more about
the causes, mechanisms and nature of diseases. Te answers
to these questions have evolved over the centuries—from
supernatural beliefs to the present state of our knowledge
of modern pathology. However, pathology is not separable
from other multiple disciplines of medicine and owes its
development to interaction and interdependence on advances
in diverse neighbouring branches of science, in addition to
the strides made in medical technology. As we shall see in the
pages that follow, pathology has evolved over the years as a
distinct discipline from anatomy, medicine and surgery, in that
sequence.
Te following brief review of fascinating history of pathology
and its many magnifcent personalities with their outstanding
contribution in the form of a disease or a process known by
their names, is meant to stimulate and generate interest in
the inquisitive beginner in pathology as to how this colourful
specialty has emerged.

History of Pathology

Didactically, pathology has its history divided into phases. These are nothing more than the description of the concepts used to explain the origin of the disease states in force in a certain time interval and according to the predominant philosophical current.

History of Pathology

Didactically, pathology has its history divided into phases. These are nothing more than the description of the concepts used to explain the origin of the disease states in force in a certain time interval and according to the predominant philosophical current.

Didactically, pathology has its history divided into phases. These are nothing more than the description of the concepts used to explain the origin of the disease states in force in a certain time interval and according to the predominant philosophical current.

The Humoral Phase (Ancient Age – Late Middle Ages)

The mechanism of the origin of diseases was explained, at this stage, by the imbalance of moods. Moods were considered to be the body fluids, in particular water, blood and lymph. The gods had the power to control this imbalance, as well as to restore the normality of the organism. This mythical view of disease was created mainly by ancient Greek civilization.

The Organic Phase (15th – 16th century)

At that time, there was a predominance of observation of the body’s organs, mainly at the expense of necropsy activities (study of the corpse) or autopsy (study of oneself).

The Tissue Phase (16th-18th century)

The Tissue Phase emphasizes the structure and organization of tissues. It is in this period that the first studies on tissue morphological changes and their relationship with functional imbalances begin.

The Cellular Phase (19th century)

With the predominance of morphological vision, added to the application of the optical microscope to medical research, the Cell Phase follows, a period considered “initial to Modern Pathology”. The concern with the study of the cell, especially its morphological and functional changes, is decisive in the search for the origin of the entire morbid process.

The Ultracellular Phase (20th century)

The Ultracellular Phase is the current phase of conceptual thinking about Pathology, involving concepts about molecular biology and cellular organelles. Biochemical advances and electron microscopy facilitate the development of this line of study.

 

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