Ferrous oxide

Ferrous oxide . It is a substance that can cause explosions as it literally burns. In its natural state it is known as hematite. It is also purified for use as a magnetic storage medium for audio and computing. This is the form of oxide commonly seen in irons and rusty steel structures that attacks from bridges to car bodies and which is tremendously destructive.

Summary

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  • 1 Natural state
    • 1 Natural iron oxide
    • 2 Synthetic iron oxide
  • 2 iron oxides
  • 3 Iron oxide II
    • 1 Reactivity
  • 4 Iron oxide III
    • 1 Structural forms
    • 2 Physical properties
  • 5 Applications of Iron Oxides
  • 6 External link
  • 7 Sources

Natural state

Iron (II, III) oxide or ferric iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ). In its natural state it is known as magnetite, a blackish-colored mineral that constitutes one of the main sources of obtaining iron . This form of rust tends to occur when iron rusts under water, which is why it is often found in tanks or under the waterline of ships.

The variety of colors of iron oxide III (blue, green and violet) that simulates the sunset, is mainly due to the ability of iron to change its electrons in the penultimate energy level with modification in the spin. From this it is intuited that the camouflage of the iguanas is due to the inclusion of this element on their skin.

Natural iron oxide

It is a product that was formed millions of years ago when, due to the different movements suffered by the earth, the incandescent poor iron coming from the interior of the earth comes out, being trapped between several layers of stone , between which it would cool down. Thus acquiring the hue that would vary, depending on this cooling, from yellowish or ocher shades to blackish or black shades, passing through different shades of red, brown and orange depending on the nature of the mineral , the temperature acquired inside the earth and the cooling rate in the highest layers of it.

  • Obtaining

It is extracted from mines that are either exploited in the open air as if it were a quarry, or from the inside opening cavities on the reef. Then, through a selection and sorting process, it goes to the milling and packaging phase. From there it would be ready for commercialization in the different industrial markets where they are used.

Synthetic iron oxide

It is created by the chemical reaction that occurs when adding certain acids to scrap metal, subject to certain temperatures and pressure. This creates a paste that will obtain one or another hue depending on the acid and the temperature used. This paste has to be dried and mortar, for its subsequent packaging and marketing.

The difference between Natural Iron Oxide and Synthetic Iron Oxide lies essentially in the manufacturing process.

It has more pigmenting power than natural iron oxide, but it cannot be said that it has less quality, since it has a high antioxidant power, which is why it has been used for many years in the manufacture of antioxidant paints and anticorrosive, such as boat paints, primers, and many other types of high quality industrial paints.

  • Obtaining

They are more difficult to produce, since it is difficult to control the chemical reaction to which iron and acids must be subjected, otherwise it can lead us to produce an oxidizing paint instead of an antioxidant paint, which is what What are we looking for. Only with demanding quality controls, such as those applied by Oxirein to its production, can optimum results be obtained in these chemical reactions.

Iron oxides

Some of these oxides are used in ceramics, particularly in glazes. Iron oxides, like the oxides of other metals, provide the color of some glasses after being heated to high temperatures. They are also used as a pigment.

  • Iron (II) oxide or ferrous oxide (FeO). Ferrous oxide dust can cause explosions as it literally burns.
  • Iron (III) oxide or ferric oxide (Fe 23 ). In its natural state it is known as hematite. It is also purified for use as a magnetic storage medium for audio and computing. This is the form of oxide commonly seen in irons and rusty steel structures that attacks from bridges to car bodies and which is extremely destructive.
  • Iron (II, III) oxide or ferric iron oxide (Fe 34 ). In its natural state it is known as magnetite , a blackish-colored mineral that constitutes one of the main sources of obtaining iron. This form of rust tends to occur when iron rusts under water, which is why it is often found in tanks or under the waterline of ships.

The variety of colors of iron oxide III (blue, green and violet) that simulates the sunset, is mainly due to the ability of iron to change its electrons in the penultimate energy level with modification in the spin. From this it is intuited that the camouflage of the iguanas is due to the inclusion of this element on their skin.

Iron oxide II

Iron (II) oxide (also known as ferrous oxide) is one of the iron oxides, whose formula is FeO. Ferrous oxide is a black powder. In this compound, the valence of iron is 2 + . Its mineral form is wustite.

Reactivity

Iron (II) oxide is thermodynamically unstable below 575 ° C, producing metallic iron and iron (II, III) oxide, according to the following reaction:

4 FeO → Fe + Fe 3 O 4

Iron oxide III

Iron (III) oxide (also known as ferric oxide) is one of the iron oxides, whose formula is Fe 2 O 3 . In this compound, the valence of iron is +3.

 

Structural forms

  • α-corundum structure.
  • γ-spinel-like structure.
  • It has no metallic luster.
  • It does not conduct electricity due to the electronic location that exists in the metal center. The formation of conduction bands is prevented.
  • Semiconduction can occur if non-stoichiometric phenomena occur.
  • The variety of colors of iron (III) oxide (blue, green and violet) that simulates the sunset, is mainly due to the ability of iron to change its electrons in the penultimate energy level with modification in the spin. From this it is intuited, that the camouflage of the chameleons is due to the inclusion of this element on their skin.

Physical properties

  • Solid aggregation state
  • Appearance Red powder
  • Density 5242 kg / m3; 5,242 g / cm³
  • Molar mass 159.7 g / mol
  • Melting point 1838 K (1565 ° C)
  • Crystal structure like corundum

Applications of Iron Oxides

  • Natural Iron Oxides are pigments that have been used since man began his wanderings on the planet, they have used it, among other things, to paint their bodies and to decorate their caves and houses. Today it is used as a pigment in many different industrial applications.
  • Ferrous oxide dust can cause explosions as it literally burns.
  • Ferrous oxide is used as a pigment. It has been approved by the Foodand Drug Administration for use in cosmetic products and is also used in some tattoo inks.

Both natural iron oxide and synthetic iron oxide could be used in the following types of industries, among others:

  • Industry the cement: Used for pigmenting any type of cement, mortar, grout, floors, terrazzo, tiles, blocks, stucco, etc.
  • Paints: Primers, waterproofing, enamels, decorative paint, coatings, etc.
  • Plastics: Masterbatch, PVC, etc.
  • Paper industry: Cardboard, cigar holder, etc.
  • Glass industry, foundry industry, industry ceramics, abrasives, food for animals , cosmetics, fertilizer , leather, rubber, asphalt , etc.

 

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