What is the European Union (Eu)?

The European Union (EU) is the current state of the so-called “European Community” that has developed over the last seven decades after World War 2, a business that has devastated the European continent. The European Union, either directly through itself or through its constituent and / or affiliated bodies, has the objective of regulating and promoting the economic improvement of its constituent national and multilateral markets, protecting human rights, achieving civil and social justice and increase the ease and effectiveness in the movement of capital, goods, services and people beyond the national borders of its member states. Starting in the “Inner Six” in the 1950s, the EU has continued to expand since it reached the zenith of member states 28,

EU constituent bodies

Council of the European Union

Represents the collective executive governments of the constituent Member States.

Court of Justice of the European Union

The EU judicial body.

Central Bank

It issues the euro and administers monetary policies for the countries that use it.

European Commission

It supports and implements treaties and decisions, suggests legislation and administers the daily affairs of European companies.

European Council

The Heads of State of EU Members, the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission.

European Court of Auditors

Investigate and verify the EU budget.

European Parliament

Directly elected part of the EU legislative body, working in collaboration with the European Commission and the Council of the European Union.

Historical background and education

The year 1945 saw the end of the most deadly episode in human history: World War 2. Many leaders throughout Europe and the world became clear that this tragic devastation arose to a large extent from previous centuries of thirty-two centuries of xenophobia and militant nationalism . In fact, both Mussolini in Italy and Hitler in Germany were able to see their respective ancestry come to fruition by spreading fear and distrust among their compatriots about other countries and even members of non-dominant minorities. As a result, several national leaders of this new post-world war 2 Europe have started working together to find solutions that could improve collaboration and trust among other European nations. At the same time, however, the

The Treaty of Paris (1951)

On April 18 th , 1951, Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany signed the Treaty of Paris. These “Inner Six” nations were primarily intent on sharing the natural resources used in heavy industry, and the treaty actually gave birth to the European Coal and Steel Community. The implications, however, were considerably broader, as this economic cooperation proved to open more doors than ever for diplomatic relations between some of the leading industrialized nations in Europe and the world. This was the beginning of what the EU would become as we know it today.

The Treaty of Rome (1957)

On the 25 th of March, 1957, the same six nations that had formed the European Coal and Steel Community came together once again to strengthen their multilateral ties. By strategically reducing customs duties related to trade between nations, this recently expanded organization, now known as the European Economic Community (EEC), allowed the free movement of people, investments, services rendered and goods imported and exported between countries. The treaty was also a giant step towards the possibility of creating multinational social policies and programs to improve the lives of people within and across the national borders of these nations.

Expansion of the European Economic Community (EEC)

After a decade and a half of generally positive developments between the EEC and its original Inner Six, the other major European economies were increasingly asking to adhere to the prospectively positive and far-reaching results. How the world greeted the New Year party in January 1 st, 1973, the EEC welcomed the accession of three new members: Denmark, Ireland and the United Kingdom. The 1980s saw further expansion, with Greece, Spain and Portugal also joining the European Economic Community. The same was also characterized by an enlargement of the EEC’s horizons, with the Schengen agreement 1985 which frees border controls between member states and the 1986 Single European Act, which does the same for trans-European free trade. While the Berlin Wall fell alongside the overthrow of communist regimes across the continent, it seemed probable, and proved prophetic, that many of these former socialist republics would one day want to be part of this same freer European community. This happened before then for East Germany,

The Maastricht Treaty

Signed in the Netherlands in 1992 and entered into force the following year, the Maastricht Treaty aimed to take a step beyond the sphere of the EEC’s past and to create a truly integrated European market. The name of “European Community” used for a long time also became official, as the term European Economic Community became less and less accurate as the Maastricht Treaty further pushed the sphere of the European Community to go beyond the realm of the economy. Perhaps one of the most important results of the Maastricht Treaty was the creation of the euro, a common currency now used by EU member states 19 instead of their own national currencies. The treaty also illustrated more details regarding the management of debts and fiscal policies.

Rapid growth in enrollment

Following the Maastricht Treaty, more and more members, including a number of former communist-controlled countries, have joined the European Community, a result enabled by the greater liberalization of policies and standards governing these new items. Austria, Finland and Sweden joined in early 1995, with an unprecedented wave of 10 new entrants to follow in May 2004. More recently, the European Union (essentially the term used to describe the current community European) added to its popular Bulgaria and Romania in 2007 and Croatia in 2013.

Brexit: the United Kingdom leaves the EU in June 2016

Since the United Kingdom was added to the European Community in 1973, many British citizens and legislators have debated whether the country’s position in the EU was justified or not. Despite the numerous privileges that the United Kingdom has received due to its status as an EU member, many critics have pointed out that, in their opinion, the so-called “membership fees” have damaged the British economy and that the freest borders have reduced British national security. The dispute between “Brexit” (which wants a British exit) and “Bremain” (wishing their country remains) came to a national referendum to decide whether the country should continue as a member of the EU. With a narrow vote, 17.4 million British voters voted to leave the European Union, far exceeding the 16.1 million that wants to stay. Voting showed a clear disparity between regions in preferences, an English and Welsh voter appeared far more inclined to want to leave the EU, and the Scots and Nordic Irish are more likely to wish to stay. This has also given rise to a resurgence in the cries of some for an Irish reunification in addition to Great Britain, and for another referendum on Scottish independence, a measure that had been voted only two years earlier. British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his intention to resign following the referendum results. Voting showed a clear disparity between regions in preferences, an English and Welsh voter appeared far more inclined to want to leave the EU, and the Scots and Nordic Irish are more likely to wish to stay. This has also given rise to a resurgence in the cries of some for an Irish reunification in addition to Great Britain, and for another referendum on Scottish independence, a measure that had been voted only two years earlier. British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his intention to resign following the referendum results. Voting showed a clear disparity between regions in preferences, an English and Welsh voter appeared far more inclined to want to leave the EU, and the Scots and Nordic Irish are more likely to wish to stay. This has also given rise to a resurgence in the cries of some for an Irish reunification in addition to Great Britain, and for another referendum on Scottish independence, a measure that had been voted only two years earlier. British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his intention to resign following the referendum results. This has also given rise to a resurgence in the cries of some for an Irish reunification in addition to Great Britain, and for another referendum on Scottish independence, a measure that had been voted only two years earlier. British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his intention to resign following the referendum results. This has also given rise to a resurgence in the cries of some for an Irish reunification in addition to Great Britain, and for another referendum on Scottish independence, a measure that had been voted only two years earlier. British Prime Minister David Cameron has announced his intention to resign following the referendum results.

The European Union (EU) – Members, Foundation and History

degree Members of the European Union Date of registration
1 Austria January of 1995
2 Belgium Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome and 1993 Treaty of Maastricht)
3 Bulgaria January of 2007
4 Croatia July of 2013
5 Cyprus May of 2004
6 Czech Republic May of 2004
7 Denmark January of 1973
8 Estonia May of 2004
9 Finland January of 1995
10 France Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome and 1993 Treaty of Maastricht)
11 Germany Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome, as West Germany)
12 Greece January of 1981
13 Hungary May of 2004
14 Ireland January of 1973
15 Italy Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome and 1993 Treaty of Maastricht)
16 Latvia May of 2004
17 Lithuania May of 2004
18 Luxembourg Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome and 1993 Treaty of Maastricht)
19 Malta May of 2004
20 Holland Founder (1958 Treaty of Rome and 1993 Treaty of Maastricht)
21 Poland May of 2004
22 Portugal January of 1986
23 Romania January of 2007
24 Slovakia May of 2004
25 slovenia May of 2004
26 Spain January of 1986
27
28
Sweden
United Kingdom
January of 1995
January of 1973

 

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