Amorúa

Amorúa.This group lives in the Orinoco and Meta rivers , especially in the area of ​​the Caño Mochuelo reservation -Hato Corozal- in the department of Casanare . Some people of Amorúa origin are mentioned in the communities of Conejo , Turpialito , Bachaco , Caño Mosquito and Dagua in Vichada.

Population

The estimated population is 178 people, spread over a perimeter of 94,670 hectares, who are part of the Caño Mochuelo reservation.

History

To date, no significant studies have been carried out on the trajectory of this group or its current situation. Some studies suggest that the Amorúa, traditionally related to other ethnic groups with Guahibo linguistic affiliation such as the Tsiripu, Wipiwe and Mariposo, could have been assimilated by ethnic groups neighboring their territory. Other authors have considered them as part of the Sikuani ethnic group. Previously they were semi-nomadic groups organized into local and regional bands, the latter made up of no more than a hundred individuals. By 1970, they were described in ethnography as a heterogeneous society composed of semi-nomadic gangs and sedentary cultivators united by the belief in a common ancestor. As a result of the bipartisan violence of the 1950s and the rise of colonization, a process of reorganization of the Amorúa gangs began in which some groups migrated to other areas and others modified their pattern of regional inbreeding, allying with others. bands that will guarantee their survival. Its traditional representation system had in the figure of the Shaman the main character of the ritual and spiritual life of the ethnic group. From that perspective, the yopo was the most representative psychotropic plant, fundamental in the performance of any ceremony, ritual and social activity. At the beginning of the eighties, some Amorúa joined the Caño Mochuelo reserve -converted into a resguardo-, avoiding the guerrilla presence and the expansion of coca cultivation. The last references about the Amorúa, in 1991, placed them in the municipality of Paz de Ariporo in Casanare, in the Caño Mochuelo reservation and in the vicinity of Puerto Carreño. Likewise, in the department of Vichada, the Amorúa lived at that time with the Guahibo or Sicuani, in the Guáripa reservation.

Culture

Its representation system has in the figure of the Shaman the main character of the ritual and spiritual life of the ethnic group. From this perspective, the Yopo is the main psychotropic plant, fundamental in the performance of any ceremony or ritual, although it is also used in social activities. The consumption of yopo, during the ceremonies, is accompanied by the consumption of tobacco and other hallucinogenic plants. Among the most important rituals that undoubtedly mark the life cycle of the ethnic group are: The “prayer of the fish”, an initiation and christening ceremony, which is widely disseminated among the groups in the region. Its general meaning is to prepare the young woman for adult life. The Itomo, which is part of the cycle of ceremonies for the second burial. It is one of the main rituals, including, above the ritual of the first ceremony, where the burial is simple and only the Shaman intervenes. The ritual allows the presence of the deceased to be perpetuated and becomes an important social activity.

Socio-political organization

In the Amorúa groups, a type of family organization prevails based on the authority of the father-in-law. The production and consumption unit and the residential unit are generally made up of an adult couple, young sons and daughters and married daughters, with their respective families. With the growth of the group, the sons-in-law tend to build separate houses. They have a Dravidian kinship system, where they classify the members of the community, and in general of the ethnic group, into two fundamental categories: that of direct blood relatives such as parents, brothers and children, as well as uncles, brothers of the same sex that the parents, brother of the father and sister of the mother and whose names can be translated as “father” and “mother”, respectively; parallel cousins, The children of the father’s brothers and the mother’s sisters are assimilated to the brothers, and the nephews and nieces, children of brothers, are associated with their own children. In the category of allies, the brothers of the mother and sisters of the father are considered, who are both in-laws and mothers-in-law, since they are the parents of cross-cousins ​​or virtual husbands and wives. In the lower generation, the sons of the sister for a male ego, and the sons of the brother for a female ego are regarded as sons-in-law and daughters-in-law who are already effectively the ones who marry the sons of ego. who are both parents-in-law and mother-in-law, since they are the parents of cross cousins ​​or virtual husbands and wives. In the lower generation, the sons of the sister for a male ego, and the sons of the brother for a female ego are regarded as sons-in-law and daughters-in-law who are already effectively the ones who marry the sons of ego. who are both parents-in-law and mother-in-law, since they are the parents of cross cousins ​​or virtual husbands and wives. In the lower generation, the sons of the sister for a male ego, and the sons of the brother for a female ego are regarded as sons-in-law and daughters-in-law who are already effectively the ones who marry the sons of ego.

Economy

Cassava as the main crop characterizes the horticulture of the Amorúa groups. The bitter cassava varieties are sown intercropped up to a dozen per field, to achieve a greater and longer production in the field. Bananas are planted in low-lying areas and in humid areas. Pineapple, beans, sweet potatoes and yams are grown in small areas next to the yucca trees, while fruit trees such as guama, mango, papaya, citrus fruits, condiments and medicinal plants are planted near the houses. For the elaboration of the alcoholic beverage, Yalaki, made from bitter yucca, an additional yuquera is planted. The preparation of new lands (activity that takes place in December), and sometimes the sowing, is carried out through the invitation or unuma, called by the head of the settlement.

After about eight months of planting the yucca trees, production is continuous, and as each family owns several farms in different stages of development, family needs are largely satisfied.

 

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