Vitamin A deficiency? Symptoms, effects and integration

Vitamin A deficiency has historically affected poor children, orphans, slaves and malnourished farmers all over the world. In the 20th century, researchers concluded that Vitamin A supported the immune system in several ways and recommended products such as dairy products and cod liver oil for the prevention of various diseases. Children were given generous amounts of butter, whole milk and eggs and the prevalence of Vitamin A deficiency was drastically reduced throughout the century, although it still remains a concern in developing countries today.

The Vitamin A plays a key role in maintaining the health of eyes and eyesight, neurological function, skin, reproductive and hormonal system and support to the lungs, liver, kidneys and digestive tract. Some of the best sources of Vitamin A are found in foods: carrots, sweet potatoes, cabbage, berries, eggs, butter, entrails.

Many people do not realize that vitamin A found in vegetables (also called provitamin A) is not the same as active and preformed vitamin A (also known as Retinol). In the body the active Vitamin A is present in the form of Retinol and bound to a fatty acid. Beta-carotene, on the other hand, is the type of Vitamin A found primarily in plants and needs to be converted into active vitamin A before it can be used by the body. This process occurs in the intestinal mucosa and in the liver.

It often happens that not all vitamin A found in plant foods is converted into active vitamin A, especially if you have poor intestinal health which makes conversion difficult. This is the reason why it is recommended to take Vitamin A through various foods that contain it, both of vegetable and animal origin. The sources of Vitamin A of animal origin in particular are more easily assimilable and usable by the body. Furthermore, caring for and curing diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome and leaky gut syndrome is essential to make your body able to improve its ability to make good use of the Vitamin A it receives.

What is Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin with immunostimulating and antioxidant properties, therefore able to help reduce the damage caused by free radicals (also known as oxidative stress). Being a fat-soluble vitamin means having the ability to travel through fats and be stored within body fat and organs, including the liver. ( 1 ) Fat-soluble vitamins can also penetrate through cells unlike water-soluble vitamins.

Vitamin A can take three different forms in the human body: retinol, retinal and retinoic acid. Assuming both plant and animal food two different types of Vitamin A are obtained. ( 2 ) The two primary forms of Vitamin A that are obtained from foods are beta-carotene (some types of plants especially those with orange, red and yellow fruits) and active Vitamin A (or Retinol) found in some animal-derived foods such as eggs and entrails.

How much Vitamin A should we take daily?

  • The amount of Vitamin A we need depends on age, health status and reproductive status (eg pregnancy or breastfeeding).
  • In adults the recommended daily dosage of Vitamin A is 900 micrograms for men and 700 micrograms for women. ( 3 )
  • The dosage of Vitamin A recommended for pregnant or lactating women is 1200/1300 micrograms per day, since the fetus needs Vitamin A for proper development.

It should also be remembered that Vitamin A is not only assimilated through food but also through specific dietary supplements, usually in the form of beta-carotene.

Integration and hiring:

From experience, rarely the lack of a single vitamin is present, exceptions naturally exist as in the past had happened with diseases like scurvy, but such cases are extreme and due to completely polarized feedings with the absence of fundamental foods.

Ideally, when we are looking for a supplement to help assimilate a certain vitamin, it is more convenient and safe to choose a balanced, quality multivitamin that respects the right dosages and also contains other useful substances such as Royal Jelly, L-Carnitine, Selenium , Folate and Coenzyme Q10 .

Thanks to these ingredients, vibracell is also an important source of antioxidants and vitamins, including: vitamin E, A and C, it also contains niacin, biotin and folic acid.

Vitamin A deficiency

When you do not consume adequate doses of Vitamin A from your diet or when it is badly absorbed or not properly converted for ready use of the body, you are exposed to a higher risk of developing a Vitamin A deficiency. the risk is for alcoholics (due to the extreme toxicity of alcohol that lowers the levels of available vitamin A), those who follow a diet that is very low in fat and those with pathologies or intestinal dysfunctions that cause poor absorption. Some other diseases can cause long-term fat absorption and since Vitamin A must be taken with fats to be effectively absorbed, if there is a problem with their absorption, there will also be a problem with the levels of vitamin available.

Health problems that can cause poor absorption of Vitamin A include: ( 4)

  • Alcoholism
  • Leaky intestine syndrome
  • Gluten sensitivity
  • Damage or liver disease
  • Pancreatic disorders or lack of bile in the gall bladder (bile assists the breakdown of fats and the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins)
  • Low levels of gastric acid, heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (irritable colon, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis)
  • Severe caloric restriction, potentially linked to an eating disorder

Furthermore, there are signs and symptoms that may indicate a deficiency of Vitamin A and below we indicate some:

  • Night blindness or potential blindness if neglected (changes in vision are some of the first symptoms that appear in the presence of Vitamin A deficiency)
  • Fetal growth disorders or poor newborn development
  • High risk of respiratory, pulmonary, auricular and sinus infections
  • Problems affecting the epidermis such as cystic acne, scaly skin, dandruff, dry scalp and spots.
  • Corneal thickening
  • Dry eyes, hair and mouth
  • Higher risk of having fertility problems or complications during pregnancy

Background

The discovery of Vitamin A in certain foods and its role for the human body occurred over a period of about 130 years starting from the early 1800s. Researchers who experimented with nutritional deprivation on animals, discovered that a diet poor in certain nutrients was harmful. and led to health problems such as corneal ulcers, poor development and increased mortality rate.

In 1880 a substance was discovered in egg yolk and in whole milk essential for nutrition, growth and development. It became clear how this lipo-soluble nutrient was also found in some animal foods such as butter but not in others such as lard and olive oil. This substance was soon renamed “liposoluble vitamin A”. Only later did scientists focus on the impact this vitamin had on the body and on the consequences of poor intake especially by underdeveloped countries and their pregnant or newborn women.

Foods rich in Vitamin A have therefore been an important source of nutrients in traditional diets for hundreds or even thousands of years, especially those that can also provide a good deal of fat and calories. In ancient Egypt and India, doctors treated symptoms such as night blindness by squeezing the “juice” of the liver of goats and lambs in the eyes of patients. The liver was also cooked for children to help protect their eyes and strengthen the immune system against infections.

Precautions for use

Although a high dose of Vitamin A can be toxic, it is very unlikely that the sole administration of foods rich in this vitamin will become a real problem. On the other hand, it is a problem to take into consideration when taking Vitamin A supplements. Studies show that at high doses, these supplements do not necessarily produce benefits, but on the contrary could cause discomfort, so it would be advisable to avoid them.

Symptoms of Vitamin A toxicity include dry skin, joint pain, vomiting, headache and confusion. Vitamin A supplements could also interact with some birth control methods such as the contraceptive pill, with anticoagulants (for example Coumadin), anti-cancer treatments, medicines for acne treatment and others. Since Vitamin A can be stored in the liver and fat it may be difficult for the body to get rid of the excess, causing it to accumulate.

Although recent studies suggest that pregnant women can benefit from the consumption of Vitamin A, reducing the mortality rate of mother and child, we remind that too high a dosage can be toxic and cause problems with the development of the fetus. We therefore advise you to consult your doctor before taking any Vitamin A dosage

The Vitamin A plays a key role in maintaining the health of eyes and eyesight, neurological function, skin, reproductive and hormonal system and support to the lungs, liver, kidneys and digestive tract. Some of the best sources of Vitamin A are found in foods: carrots, sweet potatoes, cabbage, berries, eggs, butter, entrails.

Many people do not realize that vitamin A found in vegetables (also called provitamin A) is not the same as active and preformed vitamin A (also known as Retinol). In the body the active Vitamin A is present in the form of Retinol and bound to a fatty acid. Beta-carotene, on the other hand, is the type of Vitamin A found primarily in plants and needs to be converted into active vitamin A before it can be used by the body. This process occurs in the intestinal mucosa and in the liver.

It often happens that not all vitamin A found in plant foods is converted into active vitamin A, especially if you have poor intestinal health which makes conversion difficult. This is the reason why it is recommended to take Vitamin A through various foods that contain it, both of vegetable and animal origin. The sources of Vitamin A of animal origin in particular are more easily assimilable and usable by the body. Furthermore, caring for and curing diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome and leaky gut syndrome is essential to make your body able to improve its ability to make good use of the Vitamin A it receives.

What is Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin with immunostimulating and antioxidant properties, therefore able to help reduce the damage caused by free radicals (also known as oxidative stress). Being a fat-soluble vitamin means having the ability to travel through fats and be stored within body fat and organs, including the liver. ( 1 ) Fat-soluble vitamins can also penetrate through cells unlike water-soluble vitamins.

Vitamin A can take three different forms in the human body: retinol, retinal and retinoic acid. Assuming both plant and animal food two different types of Vitamin A are obtained. ( 2 ) The two primary forms of Vitamin A that are obtained from foods are beta-carotene (some types of plants especially those with orange, red and yellow fruits) and active Vitamin A (or Retinol) found in some animal-derived foods such as eggs and entrails.

How much Vitamin A should we take daily?

  • The amount of Vitamin A we need depends on age, health status and reproductive status (eg pregnancy or breastfeeding).
  • In adults the recommended daily dosage of Vitamin A is 900 micrograms for men and 700 micrograms for women. ( 3 )
  • The dosage of Vitamin A recommended for pregnant or lactating women is 1200/1300 micrograms per day, since the fetus needs Vitamin A for proper development.

It should also be remembered that Vitamin A is not only assimilated through food but also through specific dietary supplements, usually in the form of beta-carotene.

Integration and hiring:

From experience, rarely the lack of a single vitamin is present, exceptions naturally exist as in the past had happened with diseases like scurvy, but such cases are extreme and due to completely polarized feedings with the absence of fundamental foods.

Ideally, when we are looking for a supplement to help assimilate a certain vitamin, it is more convenient and safe to choose a balanced, quality multivitamin that respects the right dosages and also contains other useful substances such as Royal Jelly, L-Carnitine, Selenium , Folate and Coenzyme Q10 .

Thanks to these ingredients, vibracell is also an important source of antioxidants and vitamins, including: vitamin E, A and C, it also contains niacin, biotin and folic acid.

Vitamin A deficiency

When you do not consume adequate doses of Vitamin A from your diet or when it is badly absorbed or not properly converted for ready use of the body, you are exposed to a higher risk of developing a Vitamin A deficiency. the risk is for alcoholics (due to the extreme toxicity of alcohol that lowers the levels of available vitamin A), those who follow a diet that is very low in fat and those with pathologies or intestinal dysfunctions that cause poor absorption. Some other diseases can cause long-term fat absorption and since Vitamin A must be taken with fats to be effectively absorbed, if there is a problem with their absorption, there will also be a problem with the levels of vitamin available.

Health problems that can cause poor absorption of Vitamin A include: ( 4)

  • Alcoholism
  • Leaky intestine syndrome
  • Gluten sensitivity
  • Damage or liver disease
  • Pancreatic disorders or lack of bile in the gall bladder (bile assists the breakdown of fats and the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins)
  • Low levels of gastric acid, heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (irritable colon, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis)
  • Severe caloric restriction, potentially linked to an eating disorder

Furthermore, there are signs and symptoms that may indicate a deficiency of Vitamin A and below we indicate some:

  • Night blindness or potential blindness if neglected (changes in vision are some of the first symptoms that appear in the presence of Vitamin A deficiency)
  • Fetal growth disorders or poor newborn development
  • High risk of respiratory, pulmonary, auricular and sinus infections
  • Problems affecting the epidermis such as cystic acne, scaly skin, dandruff, dry scalp and spots.
  • Corneal thickening
  • Dry eyes, hair and mouth
  • Higher risk of having fertility problems or complications during pregnancy

Background

The discovery of Vitamin A in certain foods and its role for the human body occurred over a period of about 130 years starting from the early 1800s. Researchers who experimented with nutritional deprivation on animals, discovered that a diet poor in certain nutrients was harmful. and led to health problems such as corneal ulcers, poor development and increased mortality rate.

In 1880 a substance was discovered in egg yolk and in whole milk essential for nutrition, growth and development. It became clear how this lipo-soluble nutrient was also found in some animal foods such as butter but not in others such as lard and olive oil. This substance was soon renamed “liposoluble vitamin A”. Only later did scientists focus on the impact this vitamin had on the body and on the consequences of poor intake especially by underdeveloped countries and their pregnant or newborn women.

Foods rich in Vitamin A have therefore been an important source of nutrients in traditional diets for hundreds or even thousands of years, especially those that can also provide a good deal of fat and calories. In ancient Egypt and India, doctors treated symptoms such as night blindness by squeezing the “juice” of the liver of goats and lambs in the eyes of patients. The liver was also cooked for children to help protect their eyes and strengthen the immune system against infections.

Vitamin A deficiency has historically affected poor children, orphans, slaves and malnourished farmers all over the world. In the 20th century, researchers concluded that Vitamin A supported the immune system in several ways and recommended products such as dairy products and cod liver oil for the prevention of various diseases. Children were given generous amounts of butter, whole milk and eggs and the prevalence of Vitamin A deficiency was drastically reduced throughout the century, although it still remains a concern in developing countries today.

Precautions for use

Although a high dose of Vitamin A can be toxic, it is very unlikely that the sole administration of foods rich in this vitamin will become a real problem. On the other hand, it is a problem to take into consideration when taking Vitamin A supplements. Studies show that at high doses, these supplements do not necessarily produce benefits, but on the contrary could cause discomfort, so it would be advisable to avoid them.

Symptoms of Vitamin A toxicity include dry skin, joint pain, vomiting, headache and confusion. Vitamin A supplements could also interact with some birth control methods such as the contraceptive pill, with anticoagulants (for example Coumadin), anti-cancer treatments, medicines for acne treatment and others. Since Vitamin A can be stored in the liver and fat it may be difficult for the body to get rid of the excess, causing it to accumulate.

Although recent studies suggest that pregnant women can benefit from the consumption of Vitamin A, reducing the mortality rate of mother and child, we remind that too high a dosage can be toxic and cause problems with the development of the fetus. We therefore advise you to consult your doctor before taking any Vitamin A dosage

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