Devil

Diablo . In the Christian religion, it is one of the names of the main enemy of God and of Christ. Some currents of modern witchcraft consider that the figure of the Devil has been taken from the figure of the pagan god of witches, assimilated to Satan in the first centuries of Christianity.

Summary

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  • 1 Origins of the devil according to the bible
  • 2 Their names and representations
  • 3 The presence of the devil in Judaism
  • 4 The Buddhist Hell
  • 5 Differences between Judaism, Christianity and Islamism, on the belief of Lucifer, Satan or Iblis.
  • 6 Sources

Devil’s origins according to the bible

In the New Testament the origin of the Devil is explained as one of the angels who became evil (John 8:44). It is inferred that he is a spiritual creature of the angelic family of God According to ancient manuscripts his real name in heaven is Luzbel and when he arrived in hell he changed his name to Lucifer to be against God, because of the desire for the adoration that all intelligent creatures rendered to the Creator. According to non-canonical myths, he was the angel who kept the throne of God, but due to his pride in wanting to become another god, he was thrown from heaven with a third of the angels. Nowhere in the Christian Bible is the devil spoken of, Luzbel understood, all the rest are demons except Lucifer, who is one of his sons, who claimed his rights and therefore was thrown out of heaven.

Their names and representations

The most common or well-known names with which the devil is named in the Bible are: Lucifer, Satan, Belial, Samael, Damian, “ancient serpent”, “great dragon”, Jaldabaoth, «The black god», «the god of this century “and” the father of lies “. He is the one who creates and directs the Beast (imperial power structure). The number of the devil, considered the Mark of the Beast, is six hundred sixty-six, (666).

The presence of the devil in Judaism

In Judaism there is no clear concept about the personification of this character unlike religions such as Christianity or Islam . In Hebrew , the biblical word ha-satan means the adversary or the obstacle, or also “the persecutor” (acknowledging that God is seen as the Ultimate Judge).

In the Book of Job (Iyov), ha-satan is a title, not a proper name, of an angel ruled by God; he is the persecuting chief of the divine court. In Judaism ha-satan does no wrong, it indicates to God the evil inclinations and actions of humanity. In essence, ha-satan has no power until humans do bad things. After God points to Job’s piety, ha-satan asks him for permission to prove Job’s piety. The just man is afflicted with the loss of his family, property, and later, his health, but he remains faithful to God. At the conclusion of this book, God appears as a whirlwind, explaining to those present that divine justice is inscrutable. In the epilogue, Job’s possessions are restored and he obtains a second family to “replace” the first one who died.

In the Torah, Satan or ha-satan is mentioned several times. An important moment arises in the golden calf incident. Satan is responsible for the evil inclination, or yetser harah, of all men. In the Torah, he is responsible for the Hebrews building the idol (golden calf) while Moses was up on Mount Sinai receiving the Torah from God. In the Book of Chronicles, Satan encourages David to do an illegitimate census. In fact, the Books of Isaiah, Job, Ecclesiastes and Deuteronomy, have passages in which God is shown as the creator of good and evil in this world.

Buddhist hell

Although Buddhists do not recognize the devil as another entity, there are some paintings of hell, in the Buddhist tradition, that show certain similarities with those of the Christian hell of the Middle Ages and the painful after-worlds of many other cultures. It is shown as a place of intense pain and torment, where its victims are subjected to the most painful torture, which is inflicted and presided over by demons. This whole world is full of flames, making it unbearably hot, although below are regions that reach bitter cold that produces the worst suffering. Hell consists of sub-planes, each specializing in a particular type of suffering suited to a certain type of clumsy action. In popular Buddhism, these subplanes are often described in great detail. There are, for example, the hell of filth, in which the corrupters of innocents stir in the mud, while they are devoured by monstrous worms. Torturers and murderers are pierced with a skewer to be roasted, and their intestines are pecked by birds with steel beaks.

Perhaps we must be careful of the literalism of these stories, which sometimes are not limited to anything more than gross superstition. Despite the fact that Buddhism has never descended on the prediction of the flames of hell, the image has sometimes been drawn in great detail. Such an emphasis can have a healthy effect, causing some people to consider the consequences of their actions more carefully, but can only induce irrational feelings of guilt and fear. While for Buddhism the existence of infernal states is an obvious and inevitable fact, it never uses the image to manipulate or induce harmful mental states of gloom, pessimism and despair, which affect many of the people who have been educated under the influence of the church, where the existence of hell is emphasized in detail, even among the youngest. A genuine moral sense comes from self-confidence and maturity, not fear.

We should not take traditional representations too literally. The basic features of hell are constant suffering and inexorable pain, imposed by angry and vengeful beings. This type of experience can be found even on earth, there are people who see the world in this way regularly. Everyone around them seems to be trying to play tricks on them and feel constantly threatened. Their primary motivation is to eliminate or evade this threat, and they are in a state of enmity, either open or covered, with almost everyone they know. They suffer agonies of insecurity and feel the pain and humiliation of all grievances, slight or imagined. They see this torment as if it were imposed on them by their enemies, who, they feel, they are constantly trying to belittle them. In many cases, due to the way they behave with others, they bring into existence the enemies that, initially, were only imaginary. Such people are dominated by the roots of the hateful state of mind and see the entire world through the veil of their projected feelings. They live in an earthly hell and make a place of torment for themselves in every situation they find themselves in. Hell is but the same state of mind that manifests itself in all its painful details after death. Such people are dominated by the roots of the hateful state of mind and see the entire world through the veil of their projected feelings. They live in an earthly hell and make a place of torment for themselves in every situation they find themselves in. Hell is but the same state of mind that manifests itself in all its painful details after death. Such people are dominated by the roots of the hateful state of mind and see the entire world through the veil of their projected feelings. They live in an earthly hell and make a place of torment for themselves in every situation they find themselves in. Hell is but the same state of mind that manifests itself in all its painful details after death.

Although the traditional Buddhist representations of hell bear a close resemblance to those of Christianity, the concept of hell differs from its Christian equivalent in two important respects. Hell is not a punishment and its duration is not infinite. Each world is the objectivization of the individual’s own mind, according to the natural functioning of the principle of karma; nobody judges and nobody condemns.

The momentum we have established will determine the type of world in which we will be reborn. The Buddhism does not have a conception of a creative being or divine judge – that is considered part of our own projections about our hopes and fears, which are based on our need for a father figure encouraging, to organize the cosmos- . The universe is made of processes that contain the laws that govern its own operation. The principle of karma is the law inherent in individualized consciousness and determines the effects of your own volitions that you will experience.

Every process is impermanent, and a particular state continues only as long as the conditions that have brought it are present. Hate-based volitions bring the experience of hell into existence. When they have been exhausted or counteracted by insightful volitions, then we will leave hell and appear in some other state that conforms to our new karmic configuration. We will remain in the state of torment for as long and as there are uncharged karmic energies to keep us there. Tradition holds that a life in hell can span many eons … perhaps this corresponds to the well-known experience of time running slowly when we find ourselves suffering.

Differences between Judaism, Christianity and Islamism, on the belief of Lucifer, Satan or Iblis.

The vision of the three monotheistic religions of Lucifer varies tremendously. While for the Jews Lucifer, Satan and Beelzebub are three different entities, Satan is a member of the Heavenly Court who acts as Prosecutor or Prosecutor of Heaven, who advises God as a kind of accuser and Beelzebub a horrible demon. Christians see Lucifer, Beelzebub, and Satan as the same entity; a demonic, evil being, the Rebel Angel who started a revolution against God in order to defeat him and not submit to his will; only with different names, but the same entity. For Christians, the Devil is the personification of all the evil in the Universe, the origin of all evil. In Islam, the Devil (Iblís) is simply a djinn or malevolent genius, a spirit of fire, but not an angel because angels are unable to rebel according to the Koran. Even Iblís grandson converted to Islam according to a hadith.

 

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