Aboriginal culture

The La Gloria site, on the south coast of Camaguey , has special significance for archaeological investigations , where in 1945 the remains of an aboriginal community with characteristics that were described as different were located.

It is a cultural group that presents a typical trousseau of gatherers and hunters (shell and stone); but it shows evidence of the manufacture of very simple ceramic vessels and in few numbers.

In addition to that already mentioned in the south of Camagüey , sites with these same characteristics have been located in Havana, Matanzas , Pinar del Río and Holguín .

Summary

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  • 1 Culture
  • 2 Food
  • 3 Ceramic
  • 4 Sources

Culture

The fact that until now not a single fragment of burn has been found in any of its sites, has led some specialists to apply the term ” proto-agricultural ” to those who may have been in the immediate moment prior to agriculture.

To explain this in more detail: a burén is a thick and flat plate of fired clay, which was placed directly on a stove and served to dehydrate cassava herina cakes known as casabe by heat .

Foods

Since cassava comes from the experience of cassava cultivation , the archeological testimony of the group indicates the degree of development of the group, which distinguishes it from those who had not reached agriculture.

But everything related to “proto-farmers” is at a point of debate, since the worldwide study has shown that ceramic production is reached when the conquests of the agricultural revolution allowed food surpluses that had to be processed in more containers. suitable than large shells.

There are those who argue that they were simply late pre-potters who exchanged technical experiences with very early potters.

This is a very serious criterion, supported by existing and confirmed knowledge that this type of exchange occurred throughout America , between different cultures.

Ceramics

But everything about the “protoagricultores” is a point of debate since the study level worldwide has shown that reaches the ceramist production when the gains of the agricultural revolution allowed surplus food that had to be processed in containers more suitable than large shells.

There are those who argue that they were, simply, a late pioneer potters who exchanged technical experiences with very early agro potters. It is a very serious criterion, supported by existing and confirmed knowledge that this type of exchange occurred throughout America, between different cultures. Others, for their part, state that if the burnon does not appear it is because they have not found it, but that it must be because there is pottery; which constitutes an idea somewhat clinging to the dogma that theories raise about the coherent transition from agriculture to ceramics .

  • Similar sites have been investigated in the Dominican Republic .

The only statement that can be assumed with certainty in this regard, is the one that concludes that its members were not known by the conquerors and, apparently, they coexisted with the last manifestations of the pre-agro-potter and the first of the agro-potters. In other words, they must have lived between the 9th and 11th centuries AD

 

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