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Depression, Anxiety and Stress Test – Learn more about DASS-21

The DASS-21 questionnaire (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale) is a test of  depression anxiety and stress that measures the levels of these disorders based on the behaviors and sensations experienced in the last seven days. It has 21 questions and takes about 3 minutes to answer. Understand how it works and make your assessment!

The DASS-21 (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale), developed by PhD Peter Lovibond , from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), in Australia, has the ability to simultaneously measure and distinguish depression , anxiety and stress . This is a test in the public domain, which can be originally accessed on the UNSW website , which is a free translation by Vittude.

It is a questionnaire with 21 questions, which measure the intensity of behaviors and sensations experienced in the last seven days. Each question is classified on a Likert scale with four points of frequency or severity of the participants’ experiences during the last week with the intention of emphasizing the emotional states over the traits.

Lovibond, compared the psychometric properties of DASS-21 with the Beck Scales for anxiety and depression, obtaining satisfactory results in proving exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. This shows that the responses to the questionnaire in fact point to a very precise indication of depression, anxiety and stress.

The DASS-21 test

The main function of the DASS-21 test is to assess the severity of the central symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. In this way, the assessment allows not only a way to measure the severity of the patient’s symptoms, but also a way to monitor and measure the patient’s response to psychological treatment .

The DASS result should not be used alone to assess the presence or absence of depression or anxiety. Higher scores on the DASS should certainly alert the psychologist  or psychiatrist  to a high level of suffering in the patient and this needs to be further explored in the context of the interview process. Likewise, low DASS scores should not be a substitute for a comprehensive clinical interview.

According to Heloisa Caiuby , a psychologist with over 30 years of clinical experience, an assessment such as DASS-21 is an objective, reliable and clear measure for an individual to understand how they are feeling. It provides the starting point and points out the direction to take.

>> Besides knowing if you have depression, anxiety or stress, how about getting to know yourself better? Our team prepared a free knowledge trail, with content on self-knowledge, self-care, meditation tips, breathing and recommendations for films and books. These contents were divided into 5 emails, which you can start receiving from now on, just click here and register!

The DASS-21 Test and diagnosis

Although DASS can contribute to the assessment of anxiety or depression levels, the questionnaire is not designed as a diagnostic tool. In fact, a number of typical symptoms of depression are not covered by DASS and need to be assessed independently. They are: changes in sleep, appetite and the appearance of sexual disorders. Therefore, DASS is not intended to replace a comprehensive clinical interview .

Important warning

The result of the evaluation does not indicate a conclusive diagnosis. To determine any potential diagnosis, discuss your outcome with a psychologist or psychiatrist .

Instructions

Please read each of the statements below carefully and mark the appropriate number 0, 1, 2 or 3. The score will indicate how much it has applied to you during the past week, as shown below:

0 – Not applied in any way

1 – Applied to some degree or for a short time

2 – Applied to a considerable degree or for a good part of the time

3 – Applied a lot or most of the time

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Mandatory fields are marked with *

1.I found it difficult to calm down *

0

1

2

3

2.I felt my mouth dry *

0

1

2

3

3.I couldn’t experience any positive feelings *

0

1

2

3

4.I had difficulty breathing at times (eg wheezing, shortness of breath, without having made any physical effort) *

0

1

2

3

5.I found it difficult to have the initiative to get things done *

0

1

2

3

6.I tended to overreact to situations *

0

1

2

3

7.I felt tremors (eg in my hands) *

0

1

2

3

8.I always felt nervous *

0

1

2

3

9.I worried about situations where I could panic and look ridiculous *

0

1

2

3

10.I felt I had nothing to be desired *

0

1

2

3

11.I felt agitated *

0

1

2

3

12.I found it difficult to relax *

0

1

2

3

13.I felt depressed and discouraged *

0

1

2

3

14.I was intolerant of the things that kept me from continuing what I was doing *

0

1

2

3

15.I felt like I was going to panic *

0

1

2

3

16.I couldn’t get excited about anything *

0

1

2

3

17.I felt I was worthless as a person *

0

1

2

3

18.I felt I was a little too emotional / sensitive *

0

1

2

3

19.I knew that my heart was altered even though I did not make any physical effort (eg increased heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia) *

0

1

2

3

20.I was afraid for no reason *

0

1

2

3

21.I felt that life was meaningless *

0

1

2

3

Name *

Email *

What is your age range? *

Occupation *

About psychotherapy: *

What is your goal? *

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