John Locke’s Wise Words on Life and Politics

John Locke (1632-1704) was an English philosopher who is remembered as the father of empiricism. He is a figure who puts his footing so that everyone enjoys certain natural rights. He is an expert in various things. He is an observer in matters of government, education, to the spiritual.

He is known as a supporter of the logical method of the Scientific Revolution. One of his major works is, “Essay Concerning Human Understanding,” which talks about self-concept as a blank page. According to him, understanding, knowledge, personality, and identity of the person only arises from the accumulation of experience.

John Locke gave birth to inspiration that was so precious to the world. Now, many wise words that have been spoken out are hunted to give enlightenment and better life guidance. For those of you who are also interested in finding inspiration, try listening to John Locke’s most inspirational words of wisdom below:

1# Few men think, yet all will have opinions. Hence men’s opinions are superficial and confused.

Some people think, all have their opinions. Therefore people’s opinions are shallow and confusing.

2# New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.

New opinions are always suspected, and usually contradictory, for no other reason than that they are not public.

3# Government has no other end than the preservation of property.

The government has no end other than to preserve property.

4# No man’s knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

There is no human knowledge here that can surpass his experience.

5# There is frequently more to be learned from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourses of men, who talk in a road, according to the notions they have borrowed and the prejudices of their education.

Often there is more to be learned from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourse of adults, who talk on the street, according to the ideas they borrow and their educational prejudices.

6# Men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.

Humans, as has been said, basically, are all free, equal, and independent, nothing can be removed from this land, and subject to the political power of others, without his own consent.

7# No peace and security among mankind – let alone common friendship – can ever exist as long as people think that governments get their authority from God and that religion is to be propagated by force of arms.

There is no peace and security among human beings – let alone mutual friendship – that can exist as long as people think that the government gets their authority from God and that religion must be propagated by force of arms.

8# Things of this world are in so constant a flux, that nothing remains long in the same state.

The things of this world are in constant turmoil, so nothing is long in the same conditions.

9# Till a man can judge whether they be truths or not, his understanding is but little improved, and thus men of much reading, though greatly learned, but may be little knowing.

Until a person can judge whether it is true or not, his understanding increases slightly, and thus the person who reads a lot, even though very well educated, but may know little.

10# Liberty is to be free from restraint and violence from others.

Freedom must be free from restraints and violence from others.

11# Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.

Hardiness is the guardian and support of other virtues.

12# No man’s knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

There is no human knowledge here that can surpass his experience.

13# The natural liberty of man is to be free from any superior power on earth, and not to be under the will or legislative authority of man, but to have only the law of nature for his rule.

Human natural freedom is to be free from all superior powers on earth, and not under the will or legislative authority of man, but only has natural laws for his rule.

14# The State, according to my ideas, is a society of men established for the sole purpose of the establishment, preservation and promotion of their civil interests. I call on civil interests, life, freedom The health of the body, the possession of external goods, such as are money, land, houses, furniture, and things of that nature

The state, according to my ideas, is a human society established for the sole purpose of the formation, preservation and promotion of their civilian interests. I call for civilian interests, life, freedom. Physical health, ownership of external goods, such as money, land, houses, furniture, and things of that nature.

15# A man in a state of society, which would delight the freedom that belongs to all members of society, must be regarded as having deliberately deprive them of all things, and therefore as being with them in the state of war.

Someone in a society, who will enjoy the freedom that belongs to all members of society, must be considered to have deliberately seized everything, and therefore with them is a state of war.

14# He that judges without informing himself to the utmost that he is capable, cannot acquit himself of judging amiss.

Whoever judges without telling himself as far as he can, cannot free himself from wrong judgment.

15# It is not always necessary to make laws, but it still is to execute those who were made.

Legislation is not always necessary, but it is still necessary to execute those who make it.

16# The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom. For in all the states of created beings, capable of laws, where there is no law there is no freedom.

The end of the law is not to abolish or detain, but to preserve and increase freedom. Because in all countries where creatures are created, legal ability, which means there is no law there is no freedom.

17# There are a thousand ways to Wealth, but only one way to Heaven.

There are a thousand paths to Wealth, but only one path to Heaven.

18# Try all things, hold fast that which is good.

Try everything, hold on to what is good.

19# It is one thing to show a man that he is in error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.

Do this by showing someone that he is wrong, and at the same time to put him in the truth.

20# I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

I always regard human actions as the best interpreters of their minds.

21# All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.

Everyone is responsible for mistakes; and most men, in many ways, because of desire or interest, are under the temptation for it.

22# The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it.

Natural conditions have natural laws to govern them, which oblige everyone: and reason, that law, teaches all mankind, who will not consult with him.

23# The speaking in perpetual hyperbole is comely in nothing but love.

Speaking in perpetual hyperbole is nothing but love.

24# The reservedness and distance that fathers keep, often deprive their sons of that refuge which would be of more advantage to them than an hundred rebukes or chidings.

The presence and distance that fathers make, often robbing their sons of protection that would benefit them more than a hundred reprimands or challenges.

25# Good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided.

Good and evil, merit and punishment, are the only motives for rational beings: this is the drive and control in which all humanity is set on work, and guided.

26# In transgressing the law of nature, the offender declares himself to live by another rule than that of reason and common equity.

In violating natural law, the offender declares himself to live by other rules aside from reason and equality.

27# Anger is uneasiness or discomposure of the mind upon the receipt of any injury, with a present purpose of revenge.

Anger is anxiety or dissatisfaction of the mind after receiving an injury, with the aim of revenge now.

28# Seek to make thy course regular, that men may know beforehand what they may expect.

Try to keep your course organized so people know in advance what they expect.

29# Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

Reading only equips the mind with knowledge material; that thought makes what we read ours.

30# I pretend not to teach, but to inquire.

I pretended not to teach, but asked.

So, that’s the collection of wise words from John Locke, the philosopher who is full of brilliant thoughts about human life and government. Hopefully useful.

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