How Psychology Affects Our Relationship With Food

Everyone knows how much food is essential to the body as it allows for survival. Even the brain as part of the body benefits from food and in particular some foods.Only the most mind-conscious people however recognize how much our psyche affects our relationship with food.Who did not happen, for example, to feel alone or bored and eat to fill an “empty”? Or skip a meal because nervous or tense? These experiences have happened to everyone, even to those who sometimes hide it.

Emotional influence.

Scientific studies show the association of mostly negative emotions (eg sadness, anger, vergona and guilt) and abdomen or food restriction. When we get home tired, frustrated or disappointed with something or someone is easy to “distract” us with the food we find at hand. Eating at those times seems like a solution, but it moves away from us and makes us grow fat, risking to worsen the situation.

Situational Influenza.

Under stress some people eat more and others leap meals. External causes (for example, work or family problems) can alter our relationship with food, causing psycho-physical problems. Also follow a particularly stressful diet stress, bringing us to eat off meal and therefore not lose weight. This is likely to increase stress and decrease self-esteem.

How to improve your relationship with food.

When you become aware of the influence of (your) psyche on your (own) relationship with food, you are ready to improve it. The next step is to contact an experienced psychologist. The professional will, in fact, help to accept their emotions, understand them, and manage them not through food.

Also by using relaxation techniques (eg autogenic training or progressive muscular relaxation) stress will go away so you can eat in a balanced way, sleep better and do not have smaller psychosomatic disturbances.

Also, the Nutritionist Psychologist will work with the Dietologist or Nutritionist so that the diet to be followed is not particularly restrictive and therefore stressful. Complete psychological treatment, providing material and advice simple and practical to help address the relationship with food and everyday life in general.

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