How to get the hepatitis A vaccine

How to get the hepatitis A vaccine is this summer’s blockbuster. After great successes like: “Dude, where is my Bexsero?” , “Whooping cough as you can” or “The last Varivax” , it was the turn of the hepatitis A vaccine, also known as Vaqta.

Is it possible to get the hepatitis A vaccine even if I am out of stock?

Firstly, to clarify that this vaccine is not systematically administered in Spain (except in Catalonia, Ceuta and Melilla) because, despite the striking increase in cases since last year, Spain is not a risk area. However, it is advisable to administer it in risk groups, such as travelers who travel to areas of the world where hepatitis A is widespread. More information here .

The Boticaria García research team, consisting of myself trying to get it due to an upcoming trip, has come up with not one but TWO solutions to find it. There they go:

  • Health centers:In the Community of Madrid only some health centers have the vaccine. Since July, the only explanations I have received from those on the other end of the phone at my health center have been: “We believe this week is coming.” There is no established notice or waiting list system. The only solution, very adapted to the times, is to make a phone call every day, talk to the person who attends the public and that this person in turn consult the infirmary if they have received vaccinations (something that takes ten minutes on average). Given the panorama, I decided to do two things: The first, Google the list of health centers and call one by one to the closest (and then to the most distant) until I found one with stocks.
  • And the second, change “for a few hours” of health center. Fortunately, The change of health center can be done at home immediately with the electronic ID or digital signature certificate. In less than an hour I managed to locate the health center, make an online appointment with the nurse and get vaccinated. Too bad it never occurred to me before. After getting the vaccine, I have “re-registered” at my health center. And no, I don’t feel bad for having moved to my center at my convenience. As a “citizen” of the Community of Madrid, I believe that we should all have the same right to receive the vaccine, whether we live in one neighborhood or another. I have “reenrolled” at my health center. And no, I don’t feel bad for having moved to my center at my convenience. As a “citizen” of the Community of Madrid, I believe that we should all have the same right to receive the vaccine, whether we live in one neighborhood or another. I have “reenrolled” at my health center. And no, I don’t feel bad for having moved to my center at my convenience. As a “citizen” of the Community of Madrid, I believe that we should all have the same right to receive the vaccine, whether we live in one neighborhood or another.
  • International vaccination center. Exceptionally, at the General Oraa vaccination center they administer the hepatitis A vaccine by presenting a medical prescription, without an appointment. Well, that is if you are lucky and that day they have vaccines. Last Monday they had, Friday no longer. Will there be today?

At this point you will think,  why didn’t you go to General Oraa in the first place if it was so easy? Because I am an obedient person who does what the health and administrative professionals tell me to do. During the month of July and August at the Francisco Silvela International Vaccination Center, they told me that the only way to get it was through my health center. Apparently, since early September they also offer the option of General Oraa. But how does one find out about it? In addition to losing the ten minutes a day of the call to my health center, do I have to lose many more calling international vaccination in case they have come up with any other solution to cover the vaccine patch? All this could be solved with a waiting list that warned travelers based on the date of request for the vaccine, urgency of the trip or the criteria deemed appropriate.

The shortage of the hepatitis A vaccine is a major problem worldwide. The professionals I have consulted agree that, especially in Madrid, we are short of the high number of vaccines that were administered in June during the World Pride. However, this is no excuse for making citizens dizzy with something so serious. The mismanagement associated with the distribution of existing units leads us, once again, to mistrust and resentment in the population. And to something more serious such as giving up the vaccination, because I assure you that I have had to really want to get it. On supply problems it may not be so easy to act, but organizing a waiting list is in our hands, I think. Or rather, in that of those who govern us.

 

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