How Much Can You Drink And Still Drive Safely:Five Facts You Must Know

How Much Can You Drink And Still Drive Safely.The question is more complex than it may seem. For one thing, weight counts. Generally, the less your weight, the higher the level of alcohol in your blood from a given amount of intake.

For example, on an empty stomach, it may take only two drinks for someone weighing 120 pounds to have the blood alcohol level reach half the legal limit within an hour; a 150-pounder may require three drinks. Starting to drink
after a full meal or its equivalent, a 150-pounder may have five drinks before reaching half the legal blood alcohol
limit.

How Much Can You Drink And Still Drive Safely And How Many beers You Can Drive and Drive?

A healthy liver needs an hour to handle one mixed drink, five ounces of wine, or twelve ounces of beer If your
liver isn’t in the best of health, it can take longer.And people vary in their reactions: Some will drive
dangerously at blood alcohol levels well below the legal limit.
Alcohol’s role in non highway injuries Although excessive alcohol use’s association with highway injuries is well
known, its relationship with many other injuries is not.In a Washington state investigation, alcohol use was
found in 10 percent of 1,750 persons with fall injuries seen in hospital emergency rooms and in 22 percent of those experiencing more than one fall injury in a year.

In a Massachusetts study, alcohol-positive Breath­ analyzer readings of 0.01 percent and higher were found in 22
percent of 620 persons treated for injuries sustained at home.

In a California study, high blood alcohol! concentrationtions  were found in 37 percent of persons sufFerrng fatalities,
with excessive levels present in 60 percent of those dying from falls and 64 percent of those dying of burns.

In a Baltimore study of adult drownings, high blood alcohol concentrations were found in 47 percent of victims.
And a New York City study found that 41 percent of deaths from falls, 46 percent of those from fires, and 53
percent of drowning deaths were associated with high blood levels of alcohol.

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