The 10 most used conjunctions in English

The conjunctions (conjunctions), also called words linking have the function of connecting ideas and phrases in order to maintain the logic of a speech.

Some of the most used in English are: and (e), although (despite), but (but), because (because), however (however) and otherwise (otherwise), among others.

Check below a list of the 10 most used conjunctions in English and their respective translations.

Consult illustrative examples and understand the function of each conjunction (explanatory, adversative, conclusive, alternative, etc.).

1. Although

Translated as though ; despite , although is a concessive conjunction. This type of conjunction makes a reservation that does not negate the main argument.

Examples :

  • She traveled by plane, although she was afraid of flying. (She traveled by plane, despite being afraid to fly.)
  • Although the sun is shining, it’s cold. (Although the sun is shining, it is cold.)

2. And

Translated as e , and is an additional conjunction. As the name implies, it adds information to the sentence.

Examples :

  • She visited Los Angeles and New York. (She visited Los Angeles and New York.)
  • He speaks German and Russian. (He speaks German and Russian.)

3. Because

Translated as because , because is an explanatory conjunction. As the name implies, it is used to explain something.

Examples :

  • They are studying because they will have an important exam tomorrow. (They are studying because they will have an important exam tomorrow.)
  • We didn’t go to the beach because it was raining.) ( We didn’t go to the beach because it was)

4. But

Translated as but , but is an adversative conjunction, that is, it indicates opposite ideas.

Examples :

  • I would like to travel, but I have no money. (I would like to travel, but I don’t have any money.)
  • She called him, but he didn’t answer the phone. (She called him, but he didn’t answer the phone.)

5. However

Translated as though ; however , however is an adversative conjunction, that is, it indicates opposite ideas.

Examples :

  • His vote, however, didn’t change anything. (His vote, however, has not changed at all.)
  • She used to love her job. At some point, however, she lost her motivation. (She loved her job. At one point, however, she lost her motivation.)

6. If

Translated as if , if is a conditional conjunction. As the name implies, it expresses an idea of ​​condition.

Examples :

  • If I had the money, I would buy a house. (If I had money, I would buy a house.)
  • I would have invited him if I knew he wanted to go. (I would have invited him if I knew he wanted to go.)

See also: If clauses

7. Or

Translated as or , or is an alternative conjunction. Thus, it indicates the idea of ​​alternation; option.

Examples :

  • Which is your favorite color? Blue or green? (What is your favorite color? Blue or green?)
  • Are they brothers or cousins? (Are they brothers or cousins?)

8. Otherwise

Translated as otherwise ; otherwise ; otherwise , otherwise is an alternative conjunction. Thus, it indicates the idea of ​​alternation; option.

Examples :

  • You need to study hard, otherwise, you won’t pass the exam. (You need to study hard. Otherwise, you will not pass the exam.)
  • I really like my team, otherwise, I would have quit my job. (I really like my team. Otherwise, I would have quit my job.)

9. Since

Translated as long as ; since , since is an explanatory conjunction. As the name implies, it is used to explain something.

Examples :

  • You can use the pool since you pay for it. (You can use the pool as long as you pay for it.)
  • Since the government quit the scholarship program, I will have to give up my research. (Since the government ended the scholarship program, I will have to give up my research.)

10. So

Translated as then ; therefore , only it is a conclusive conjunction, that is, it is used to indicate the conclusion of an idea.

  • You know I am paying attention to the teacher, so stop talking to me! (You know I’m paying attention to the teacher, so stop talking to me!)
  • He doesn’t speak English, so he had trouble finding a job. (He doesn’t speak English, so he had a hard time finding a job.)

See also: Linking Words

Conjunctive adverbs vs. conjunctions

The difference between these two grammatical categories is that, while conjunctive adverbs connect independent sentences, conjunctions (conjunctions) introduce subordinate clauses, that is, they depend on a main sentence to make sense.

Examples :

  • I invited him, buthe didn’t come . (I invited him, but he didn’t come.) – but introduces a subordinate sentence: but he didn’t come .
  • Ziraldo is an author, a cartoonist and a painter; moreover, he is a journalist . (Ziraldo is an author, cartoonist and painter; in addition, he is a journalist.) – moreover connects two independent phrases.

Below is a table with some of the conjunctive adverbs most commonly confused with conjunctions.

Conjunctive adverb Translation Example
consequently consequently Daniel and Jean are highly qualified professionals. Consequently , they gain high salaries .

(Daniel and Jean are highly qualified professionals. Consequently, they earn high salaries.)

furthermore Besides that; Furthermore She is a dedicated teacher. Furthermore , we can always count on her .

(She is a dedicated teacher. In addition, we can always count on her.)

moreover Besides that; including She is really clever; moreover , she’s got the best grades in her class.

(She is very smart. Plus, she has the best grades in her class.)

therefore therefore; like this; So Amy was starving. Therefore , she went to a pizzeria .

(Amy was hungry, so she went to a pizzeria.)

 

Leave a Comment